Career professionals: whadda dey know?

Career Switch

The rate of people changing jobs has been growing month-to-month as the economy slowly recovers from its pandemic lows of 2021.

Information about work and skills is in high demand.  But a labour market study published during November 2021 shows that only 1 out of 5 adults (of about 15 million adults aged 25-64 in Canada) make use of career services to help with their career decisions.  The other 80% tend to rely on family and friends for career advice.  

Not surprising, since most career decisions are private matters, and most adults turn to people they trust for advice during different stages of their lives:

–       What to study while in high school.

–       What to do with a diploma or degree after graduating from college or university.

–       How to get out of the educated-but-under-employed rut.

–       How to deal with job loss or long-term unemployment.

–       How to advance in career once one is employed.

–       How to change jobs or careers without a major loss of income.

–       How to find a job as a newcomer to Canada.

–       How to retire but keep working.

As a career professional for 30 years, I’ve encountered all these situations and continue to do so as many of my past clients refer their family and friends to me ( thank you! ) to advise them on these important transitions.

Help is available

Studies also show that people who use career professionals to assist with these decisions have better outcomes more often than people who rely only on family and friends for advice.

I get it…it can be confusing to navigate the career services ecosystem to find what you need at any stage in your life because there exists a complex set of services—some provided by schools, some by government departments or third-party agencies (funded by government), or non-profit agencies, or private sector companies, or independent practitioners (like me).  The different career terms, supports and capacity used by these service providers adds to the confusion.

I am not the career professional suited for everyone.  It is important for me to know if or how I can best help you.  And to steer you in the right direction.  I need to earn your trust.

That is why I do my best to read these studies, to engage in continuous learning, to update my credentials, so that I can provide you with reliable and accurate guidance about work and skills in this country and elsewhere.  You deserve it!

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